Welp. So much for a seven game series.

The Warriors finished off the Cavaliers in five games and Kevin Durant got his ring. I was ready for the circus. I wrote in a post last year about it, and I’m too lazy to link to it. I have no issues with Durant joining the Warriors. Sure, it was “weak sauce” hopping over to the team you had just lost to in the Western Conference Finals (in 2016) after blowing a 3-1 series lead, but I’m all for mobility and movement in life. You wouldn’t bash somebody for taking a pay raise or career position upgrade, would you? So don’t bash pro athletes.

One thing I will never be able to — because I refuse to — empathize with is home city homer-ism. I will state what I’ve said since the beginning of TSTOS and before when I had project blogs on WordPress in 2005 and 2006: there are no pro sports teams (at least in the three major American sports) where I grew up in southwest Virginia. Not one. The closest pro sports franchises around are the Carolina Panthers, Charlotte Hornets, etc. Outside of Virginia Tech sports programs, which of course is collegiate, I never had a ‘local’ pro sports team to choose from.

So, the Rams leaving St. Louis didn’t affect me other than making all my St. Louis Rams items collectors items. The Rams have left Cleveland, Los Angeles and St. Louis. I don’t even bother looking at the comment sections of Rams’ social media posts, because it’s always the same things: folks from LA and St. Louis bashing one another, all out of ignorance. Wasted endeavors.

With that said, over the years I’ve developed a broadened perspective on pro sports. It’s not just a black and white mentality to me, as a fan. I appreciate just about all teams in sports. I wish not only the Celtics, but the Lakers, Knicks, 76ers, etc. to be competent franchises in the NBA, because I think it makes the product better (to see classic franchises succeed)!

Before the 2011  MLB season, I wrote that I’d be OK with Albert Pujols leaving the Cardinals, as he was 31 or 32 and already spent his prime years with the Cards, and that I’d be annoyed if they rewarded him with a massive contract just for performing, that doing so would handicap the future of the franchise. The Cardinals won the World Series that year and ensuingly allowed Pujols to walk and go to the Los Angeles Angels for an egregious amount of cash. I was cool with it. Pujols was and is my all-time favorite baseball player, but I knew such a contract would be pure shit for the Cardinals. My buddy — who has since come around — was furious when Pujols left… it was smart for Pujols to take the money the Angels offered him, so I don’t blame him. And I don’t blame Kevin Durant for going to the Warriors because he wanted to win.

With all this bloviating, I still side with LeBron in 2010 — just as I did back then — when he left Cleveland. I never liked that he returned to Cleveland in 2014, though, just because of the way those idiots acted when he left. He’s the greatest athlete that has ever graced Cleveland (move over, Jim Brown), and they disrespected him by burning jerseys and all that jazz. I wield a little bit of bitterness over the Warriors blowing that 3-1 lead in the Finals last year, because I can’t help but contend that the city of Cleveland nor Dan Gilbert deserved that championship last year. It’s as though they were rewarded for the temper tantrums they collectively threw in 2010. That’s bullshit, to me.

LeBron James’ teams are 3-5 in the NBA Finals. So what? Jerry West is the logo of the NBA and his teams went 1-8 in the NBA Finals. Nobody bats an eye. My girlfriend — who enjoyed some parts of the NBA Finals but is relatively new to watching — asked me, “If LeBron is the best player in the world, why is he not so loved?” He’s always been polarizing. He’ll never get the full credit he deserves. He averaged a triple double in this Finals, and there are utter morons out there who are blaming him for the Cavs losing to a superior Warriors team. That is asinine.

The older I get, the less ‘crazed’ I am about the “my team vs. the world” mentality. I’m much more appreciative and open minded about hearing from fans who are impartial and objective about sports instead of eager to impulsively post hot takes on players or bash players for idiotic reasons whether for homer-ism of their own teams or blissful ignorance.

Why can’t we just appreciate what we are seeing?

We just watched the Warriors and Cavs play in back to back to back NBA Finals, and that’s awesome. We won’t get to see Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant, LeBron James and Kyrie Irving play forever; they won’t always be in their prime forever. Also, how incredible was it to see both teams practically completely healthy? That’s amazing and typically unlikely. We are lucky to be able to witness this epic amalgamation of talent on the court all at once.

Yet people bitch, they moan, they cry, they whine.

I’ll pose this question again: did this kind of bitching happen in the 1980s when the Lakers and Celtics were virtually in every NBA Finals either against one another three times or against other squads?

Maybe it did. I’m sure if the internet and social media were around, of course somebody would have bitched, because in the heat of the moment, just like today, folks post their opinions at impulse without a moment of patience to allow a thought to process, settle and stew for a bit.

Yet all these bitchin’ folks watched the Finals, I’m sure, and I’m positive they enjoyed themselves watching them.

Sure, the regular season of the NBA is awful, but I’m weary of long, drawn out regular seasons, anyway. I wouldn’t complain if Adam Silver & Co. reduced the amount of games in the regular season. I don’t care about teams resting star players, because I hardly watch regular season basketball outside of highlights.

Moral of all the inane rambling above: let’s all collectively appreciate greatness. The Warriors are great. LeBron is top notch. Let’s stop bashing professional athletes for wielding the opportunity for mobility/upgrading. Be a fan of your team, not the city.

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